Parenting education Parenting education

General parenting education issues, plus content on engaging fathers in programmes delivering education and support to parents to help them in their role.

Blog » Parenting education
18 November 2014 | Leave a comment
Jeremy Davies writes: Two years ago the Fatherhood Institute published a global research review which identified and explored the evidence on parenting and other programmes’ promotion of father-involvement in the first eight years of children’s lives. 
FI research » Parenting education
7 November 2014 | Leave a comment
High quality (sensitive/supportive) and substantial father involvement from the month following birth is connected with a range of positive outcomes in babies and toddlers, including higher IQs at 12 months and 3 years. 
FI research » Parenting education
7 November 2014 | Leave a comment
Five-year-olds with two supportive parents score more highly on language development. Shared decision-making by mother and father is directly linked to very young children’s better academic and social skills   Research shows that babies as young as three months are fully equipped to pay attention to two people at the same time: • Babies can rapidly shift their gaze from one person to the other as the interaction develops, sharing attention and feelings with both adults. 
FI research » Parenting education
7 November 2014 | Leave a comment
Attachment security is associated with superior functioning in young children – and young children with secure attachments to both parents do better than children who are securely attached to only one parent. 
FI research » Parenting education
7 November 2014 | Leave a comment
Babies do better when planned by both parents Husbands who understand the risk of pregnancy complications will support their wife’s use of appropriate services Mother-to-child transmission of HIV can be prevented when mothers stick to their medication supported by their husbands or partners. 
FI research » Parenting education
7 November 2014 | Leave a comment
Men who understand the risk of pregnancy complications will support their partner’s use of appropriate services. Mothers who have a calm and supportive birth partner have better labours.