David Lammy’s report for the Labour Party policy review

21 June 2013

This report for the Labour’s Party’s policy review, written by David Lammy MP, presses the agenda forward on paternity leave, calling for adequate pay levels and independent leave rights, paid antenatal appointments and part time leave and pay. It was published in June 2013.

The Fatherhood Institute sat on the expert panel which advised Mr Lammy.

Download this FREE report from this link: Doing Family: Encouraging Active Fatherhood

Read the press release about this report.

Tags: , , ,


One Comment »

  • nongenderbias9 says:

    “And we need to stop ceding discussion of fathers who do not
    live up to our high expectations to the Conservatives. We should all be concerned when
    dads do not fulfil their responsibilities, and we should do all we can to help them fulfil those
    responsibilities”.

    I wish to comment on this quote from the report because I find it threatening. I am a father and the thought that we would be concerned about all fathers that do not fulfil their responsibilities is sexist talk. It’s a shame because most of the rest of the paper seems reasonable, balanced and fair.
    One of the main impediments to progress with family law is the assumption that mother does “care” and father does “responsibility” which, if he is deemed to have been naughty is something he must beg/apply for in the family courts. Our Institutions translate “care” to mean what mother does with the children and “responsibility” as the money father has to pay for the upkeep of his children (to whom he remains always a grave and fearful potential danger). Father and mother are both in fact, carers and as adults they are both equally and severally responsible.

    In the present system mother has her misdemeanours hidden by Institutions whose job it is to shield them from a percieved threat from father who is not only burdened by his own indiscretions but finds himself taking the blame for mothers failings too. From birth to death the object of the game is to keep him at arms length from his children and under the strictest guidelines as per mothers doctrine. We need to move away from this to a more collaborative approach where parenting is shared, even after separation.

    Kind regards

Leave a comment!

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.